Matter Changing States

State of Matter Changes

Fifth Grade


Description

Students melt different materials and determine whether or not a change in the physical state of matter changes the matter’s total weight.

Materials

Printed

  • 1 Student Journal: State of Matter Changes (per student)
  • 1 Student CER (per student)

Reusable

  • 1 Hot plate (per group)
  • 1 Triple beam balance (per group)
  • 4 4-inch aluminum pie pans (per group)
  • 2 Oven mitts (per group)

Consumable

  • 2 Gummy candy (per group)
  • 1 Can of solid shortening (per class)
  • 1 Plain chocolate bar (per group)
  • 1 Tbs Butter (per group)

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Student Journal: State of Matter Changes

Procedure and Facilitation Points

Teacher Notes:

  • Be sure to take precautions with the heating element and hot pie pans.
  • Students should use oven mitts to move the aluminum pie pan safely to the triple beam balance.
  • Alternatively, the teacher may transport the pan for students.
  • Caution must be taken to remove the pan from the heat source as soon as the substance begins to melt. Melting will continue even after removal from the heat source because the pan will still be hot. Excessive exposure to the heat source will cause burning and a directly related loss of mass.
  • Part One

  • Discuss as a whole group:
    1. What properties changed when the ice cube melted? It changed from a solid state to a liquid state. It changed its shape. It changed its temperature.
    2. What properties remained the same when the ice cube melted? The mass stayed the same.
    3. Explain how this was only a physical change. The substance is still water even though its state of matter changed.
  • Part Two

    1. Select a material, place it on an aluminum pan, and measure the mass using a triple beam balance. Record this data on the chart.
    2. Place the pie pan with the material in it on to a hot plate, and let the substance melt.
    3. After the material has melted, use oven mitts or the teacher’s assistance, to transport the pan from the hot plate to the triple beam balance.
    4. Measure the material’s mass on the triple beam balance again. Record this data on the chart.
    5. Repeat the previous steps for each material (gummy candy, shortening, chocolate, and butter).
    6. Be sure to turn off the hot plate as soon as your group is done melting all materials.
    7. Discuss
      • What happened when we added heat to each substance? The substances changed from a solid to a liquid.
      • How did the mass before melting the substance compare to the mass after melting the substance? The mass was about the same for each substance.
      • Why do you think the mass was the same after the substance melted? We did not add or take away anything from the pie pan. If we were to leave the pie pans on the hot plate for a long time, some of the liquid might evaporate, which may cause the mass to change.
  • Part Three

  • Teacher note:
  • This part can be completed the following day or when all materials have had time to harden.
    1. Place the pie pan with melted materials aside (off hot plate), and allow time for the materials to become solid again.
    2. Discuss:
    3. What do you think will happen to the mass once the materials return to their solid state? The mass will stay the same unless some of the liquid evaporated when it was heated.
    4. Once all the materials have returned to a solid state, place the aluminum pans on the triple beam balance to measure the mass.
    5. Record the mass in the data table.
    6. Record all collected data in a triple bar graph in your Student Journal.

Prompt (CER)

Write a scientific explanation describing whether or not a change in the physical state of matter changes the matter’s mass.

Sample claim:

A change in state of the matter does not change the matters mass.

Sample evidence that support the claim:

The mass of the gummy candy was the same before and after it melted. The mass of the shortening was the same before and after it melted. The mass of the chocolate was the same before and after it melted. The mass of the butter was the same before and after it melted.

Sample reasoning that argues the claim and evidence:

In each of the materials that were tested, applying heat might have changed the state of matter from a solid to a liquid, but the mass did not change. The mass did not change because nothing was added to or taken away from the pie pan. Changing the state of matter did not change the amount of material in the pan.

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Student CER

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Teacher Rubric with Sample Student Responses